colorado Mountains

Drug Rehab in Denver Colorado

Denver



Thin Dotted line for Colorado Drug Rehab

Call 877-888-4802 for personal and confidential referral to alcohol and drug rehab programs in Denver and throughout Colorado.

Demographics
Population (2006 American Community Survey): 566,974

Race/ethnicity (2006 American Community Survey): 68.2% white; 9.9% black/African
American; 1.0% American Indian/Alaska Native; 3.1% Asian; 0.1% Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander; 15.0% other race; 2.8% two or more races; 34.8% Hispanic/Latino (of any race)

Programs/Initiatives
• High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA)8 Designated in 1996, the Rocky Mountain HIDTA is responsible for areas in Colorado, Montana, Utah and Wyoming. This HIDTA is responsible for 17 Colorado counties, including Denver.
• Denver Office of Drug Strategy Created in August 2000, this office serves the residents of Denver and offers resources on substance abuse and addiction. The primary focus of the office is to educate the community in the areas of substance abuse, addiction, prevention, intervention, treatment, transition and recovery.

Crime and Drug-Related Crime
During 2007, the Denver Police Department reported 1,357 adult arrests for drug abuse violations.10 In 2006, there were 2,609 such arrests reported.

Offense
2006 Juvenile 2006 Adult 2007 Juvenile 2007 Adult
Murder 9 1 20
Rape 5 76 7 63
Robbery 60 286 40 206
Aggravated assault 121 814 78 706
Burglary 167 424 115 326
Larceny 99 564 53 324
Auto Theft 125 251 66 235

Drugs
• Cocaine Reports from law enforcement indicate that cocaine is still the most popular drug in Denver, although the total percent of cocaine exhibits submitted to the Denver Police Department Crime Laboratory (DPCL) has remained static from 2003 to 2007 (range 17.3% to 21%). In December 2007, powder cocaine prices in Denver were: $18,000- $20,000/kilogram, $600-$1,000/ounce and $100-$150/gram, with purity ranging from 50%-60% at the retail level. Crack cocaine prices were as follows: $15,000- $20,000/kilogram, $650-$900/ounce and $20/rock with purity ranging from 75-85% at the retail level.
• Heroin Law enforcement authorities and public health professionals in Denver have reported increased heroin distribution and abuse. This increase is partly the result of the emergence of new, younger adolescent heroin abusers. Prices for heroin in Denver during December 2007 were as follows: $24,000-$35,000/kilogram and $800- $1,600/ounce. Heroin purity ranged in Denver from 6%-73%.
• Marijuana A 2005 vote in the City and County of Denver legalized ounce or smaller amounts of marijuana for personal recreational use.17 In the Denver metro area, Mexican marijuana is of low purity and high availability. During December 2007, marijuana prices in Denver were as follows: Mexican marijuana: $300-$500/pound and $80-$100/ounce and $30-$60/one-quarter once. Locally-produced marijuana: $2,000/pound

BC Bud: $2,600-$5,000/pound and $300-$400/ounce

Methamphetamine: Many Denver metro area clinicians and outreach workers report that many stimulant users prefer methamphetamine over cocaine because of its cheaper price, ready availability and longer lasting high. During December 2007, powder methamphetamine produced in Mexico sold for $12,000-$16,000/pound and $500-$800/ounce. Crystal methamphetamine produced in Mexico sold for $16,000-$20,000/pound and $1,000-$1,500/ounce.

Club Drugs
• The trafficking and abuse of MDMA are increasing in the in the Denver area.20 The
street price for MDMA in Denver is $20-$25/pill.

Pharmaceutical Diversion
• Nearly all local clinical and outreach workers report that the increase in “other opiate use” is due to the easy access to a variety of prescription narcotics, such as Vicodin, Percodan and Percocet.
• During 2007, approximately 46,113 Denver residents reported dependence on or Abuse of any illicit drug or alcohol within the past year, representing approximately 3.30% of the population.

Drugs Involved in ED Reports, Denver January-Dec. 2007

Major Substance of Abuse Number of Reports
Alcohol 5,137
Cocaine 3,926
Heroin 925
Marijuana 2,249
Amphetamines 397
Methamphetamine 779
MDMA (ecstasy) 159
GHB 16
Flunitrazepam (Rohypnol) 4
Ketamine 12
LSD 81
PCP 16
Miscellaneous Hallucinogens 72
Other 79
TOTAL 13,852

Estimates of the economic costs of unaddressed substance abuse in the City and County of Denver exceed $600 million annually.
There were 79 reported deaths in Denver related to cocaine during 2005.

Admissions:Treatment, Primary Drug of Abuse, Denver/Boulder Metro Area 2005- 2007

Drug Type 2005 2006 2007
Alcohol 3.575 4.407 4.321
Cocaine 1,460 1,849 1,807
Heroin 1,107 810 807
Marijuana 2,695 2,901 2,824
Amphetamines 21 34 17
Metrhamphetamine 1,494 1,696 1,672
Club Drugs 24 24 39
Depressants 45 57 48
Hallucinogens 17 25 17
Other 40 37 75
TOTAL 10,812 12,253 12,027


There are approximately 31,000 Colorado drug rehab and addiction treatment center admissions each year, however, due to the high relapse rate of many traditional programs most families in Denver are searching for something that works. This is where Colorado Drug Rehab can help.

The Rocky Mountain News reported in December, 2007 the following message, which shows that our society is giving up on drug rehab and treatment. Mostly because there are so many ineffective drug rehab and drug treatment centers graduating people whose drug cases are not handled and they are leaving rehab with the ideas that they will always be addicted. When society feels it can't help in a humane way, the following is the result:

"People in Denver are more likely to go to prison for drug offenses than residents in almost all other urban areas of the country, according to a study made public today.

About 147 of every 100,000 Denver residents served time for drugs in 2002, according to the study by the nonprofit Justice Policy Institute, which studies alternatives to imprisonment. The 2002 data was the most recent and complete available, the group said.

That placed Denver, Colorado 12th out of the 198 most populous counties nationwide - higher than New York, Los Angeles and Detroit. The highest were the counties that include Bakersfield, Calif.; Atlantic City, N.J.; and New Orleans.

The study found that black residents across the country - including in Denver and the metro area - go to prison for drugs at a much higher rate than whites, though the group says studies have shown the rate of actual drug use is similar across racial lines."

News Item of Interest...Are we ready for this level of social change?

Taken From the Denver Post, Jan. 22, 2010

The woman gracing Kush Colorado's centerfold is long-limbed and lovely, but the new magazine's real star is the marijuana plant she clutches to her breast.

Billed as the "premier cannabis lifestyle magazine," the slick glossy debuted in Colorado last month, one more sign of galloping growth in the state's medical-marijuana business.

The city of Denver has more than 300 medical-marijuana dispensaries, the highest number in the nation outside California.

The pace of growth in the industry prompted the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws to recently name Denver "America's cannabis capital." While Los Angeles has more than 1,000 dispensaries, Denver outstrips the City of Angels on a per-capita basis, with more storefronts selling pot than Starbucks shops peddling coffee.

Read the complete story at news.php

Program In And Around Denver, Colorado

These programs are not endorsed by Colorado Drug Rehab, even though we have reviewed some of them on site, they haven't met the criteria to be recommended. However, some of these rehab programs are free and some are outpatient, so they may be of help to you. For better information call us...

Program
Address
City
Type of Rehab
Arapahoe House 8801 Lipan St Denver Alcohol and Drug Treatment.. State Funding
Alcoholics Anonymous 2785 N Speer Blvd # 224 Denver AA Support Group Meetings
Community Resource for Alcohol & Family Treatment 200 S Sheridan Blvd Lakewood Alcohol and Drug Rehab for Families
Addiction ResearchTreatment Services 1827 Gaylord St Denver Methadone and Therapeutic Community
Aurora Center for Treatment Inc 1591Chambers Rd # E Aurora Alcohol and Drug Treatment

The Solution

Drug rehab that addresses the individual through a biophysical approach is the most successful method. While the right program may not be in Denver, our philosophy is to refer you to the best possible drug rehab center that can help handle the problem for good. We will refer you to drug rehab centers that don't use drugs in any way, as a longer-term drug-free program will typically have the best overall results.

Colorado Drug Rehab is a free service that will help you find a drug rehab for any alcohol or drug addiction problem you or a loved one may be having. It is easy to confuse the different terms used in this field, describing the different types of drug rehab centers, drug rehabilitation centers, and substance abuse treatment programs. For the problem that you are addressing, should you be looking for an Outpatient, In-patient, Residential Treatment Center, Long term or Short term treatment and what modality of treatment is the most effective and what are the cost related to these forms of treatment or rehab.

Please fill out this short information form so that we can assist you to find a good rehabilitation facility with a high success rate. We are knowledeable in drug rehab methods and we will help you with your situation.

 

Below are a sampling of Narcotics Anonymous (NA) meeting in the Denver area NA is a program much like Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), but slanted towards users and abusers of narcotics. These listings are provided as a service of Colorado Drug Rehab; please call ahead to ensure that the meeting is taking place and is open to the public. Colorado Drug Rehab is not associated with Narcotics Anonymous. We feel, however, that resources should be made available wherever possible. For a complete listing go to: http://www.nacolorado.org/denver/meetinglist2.html

Narcotics Anonymous Meetings in Denver (Partial List)

Meeting Name
Address 1
Address 2
City
State
Zip
Day
Time
               
"GLBT Community Center"
1050 Broadway Street
Second Floor Library
Denver
CO
80203
Saint Barnabas Episcopal Church
1280 Vine Street
West entrance upstairs on right
Denver
CO
80002
Friday
17:45:00
Presbyterian Church
5400 South Yosemite Street
Denver
CO
80022
Monday
12:00:00
GLBT Community Center
1050 Broadway Street
Second Floor
Denver
CO
80203
Saturday
19:00:00
121 Acoma Street
121 Acoma Street
Denver
CO
80223
Sunday
09:30:00
Presbyterian Church
5400 South Yosemite Stree
Denver
CO
80022
Thursday
12:00:00
Saint Barnabas Episcopal Church
1280 Vine Street
West entrance upstairs on right
Denver
CO
80002
Tuesday
19:00:00
Presbyterian Church
5400 South Yosemite Stree
Unit G
Denver
CO
80022
Wednesday
12:00:00

 

Alcoholics Anonymous Meetings in Denver, Colorado (Partial List)

 

Day
Time
Group Name
Address
City
Comments
Sunday
07:00 AM
Attitude Adjustment
1311 York St., 322-3674
Denver
Non-Smoking
Sunday
08:00 AM
AA Odrodzenie
2525 W. Evans Ave. (Polish 882-1038)
Denver
Polish
Sunday
08:00 AM
Dawn Patrol
1865 S. Pearl St.
Denver
Non-Smoking
Sunday
08:00 AM
Six Sixteen
1663 S. Acoma St., 303-785-0394
Denver
Step Meeting
Sunday
09:30 AM
Sun. Morning 9:30
1311 York St., 322-3674
Denver
Non-Smoking
Sunday
10:00 AM
El Buen Camino
1679 47th Ave.
Denver
Spanish
Sunday
10:00 AM
Extended Hand
620 Elizabeth St. (Ch sch bsmt cafeteria)
Denver
Beginners
Sunday
Noon
AWOL
1865 S. Pearl St.
Denver
Women's
Sunday
08:00 PM
The Way Out
1155 Cherokee (Detox, Rm 103)
Denver
Non-Smoking
Monday
07:00 AM
Dawn Patrol
1865 S. Pearl St.
Denver
Non-Smoking
Monday
Noon
Happy Trudgers
1820 Broadway (Ch. Annex bsmt.)
Denver
Non-Smoking
Monday
05:45 PM
Sunlight
324 S. Sherman St.
Denver
Smoking
Monday
08:00 PM

Denver Young People

2122 S. Lafayette (Ch rear)
Denver
Young People, Non-Smoking

This is a very partial list. Presented here to let you see the veriety of meetings and the amount. If you want to find more in Denver and surrounding cities, go to this link: http://www.daccaa.org/ for the Denver Area Central Committee of Alcoholics Anonymous, AA HOTLINE (24 Hour) 303-322-4440 to find other meetings in your area of Denver.

 

Colorado Drug Situation

Cocaine is considered a significant drug threat to Colorado. Powder cocaine is readily available throughout the State and crack cocaine is available in urban population areas. Cocaine is the drug most often associated with violent crime in the State. Cocaine is generally sold in ounce and pound quantities in Colorado. Law enforcement reports indicates that the decrease in availability of Cocaine in 2007 was accompanied by a corresponding increase in cocaine prices and a decrease in cocaine purity. Some reported price increases were significant--nearly doubling in some cases--while others were less dramatic, remaining near or only slightly higher than the normal price ranges. Crack use is declining but remains available in the larger metropolitan areas of Colorado. The distribution and abuse of powder and crack cocaine are a significant threat in the Denver area even though there has been a decrease in most US cities.

Cocaine is frequently abused in Colorado. The percentage of Colorado residents who report having abused cocaine in the past year is higher than the percentage nationwide. According to the 1999 and 2000 NHSDA, 2.5 percent of Colorado residents age 12 and over reported having abused cocaine in the year prior to the survey compared with 1.6 percent nationwide. The number of calls coming to Colorado Drug Rehab about cocaine problems is a firm indicator of this statistic. Most calls from Colorado are requesting state-funded residential drug rehab, but in following up with these calls, it is found that there is usually a two to three week waiting list to get into a cocaine drug rehab in Colorado that is state-funded. There are private beds in Colorado that are available for immediate care. The Colorado Single State Agency, ADAD, reports: despite the fact that cocaine is readily available and frequently abused, cocaine-related treatment admissions to publicly funded facilities in Colorado are declining. This information confirms the problem of a two to three week waiting list.

Club drugs, which are mostly synthetic substances, are increasing in availability and use in Colorado. LSD in liquid form is readily available in the metropolitan areas of Colorado. During 2001, 34% of those surveyed in Colorado reported lifetime usage of MDMA. 4.5% of those surveyed reported usage of MDMA within the past 30 days. The average user age was 17.3, and the average age of first time use was 15.9 years.

Heroin - The most common types of heroin available in Colorado are Mexican black tar heroin and brown powdered heroin. New heroin users in Colorado are often young adults who smoke or snort the drug rather than inject it. This is due to a misconception that this practice is safer and less likely to lead to addiction. Mexican black tar and brown powder heroin also are significant drug threats in 2007 in the Denver area.

Marijuana is readily available in multi-pound quantities throughout Colorado . A highly potent form of marijuana, called "BC Bud," is also easily obtainable. Marijuana is the most commonly abused illicit drug in Colorado. The percentage of Colorado residents who report having abused marijuana in the past month is higher than the percentage nationwide. According to the 1999 and 2000 NHSDA, 7.8 percent of Colorado residents age 12 and over reported having abused marijuana in the year prior to the survey compared with 4.8 percent nationwide

Methamphetamine is a primary drug threat to Colorado. Crystal methamphetamine, also known as glass in Colorado, is becoming increasingly available throughout the State and has tested as high as 90% pure. Purity levels for methamphetamine vary in Colorado.

Prescription Drugs - The diversion and abuse of OxyContin (oxycodone) is a significant problem in Colorado. Hydrocodone (Vicodin) and Darvocet are the most commonly abused controlled substances.

What is K2? K2. Spice. Colorado Chronic. Black Mamba. Fake Weed. Genie. Voodoo. Zohai. FIYA. Blaze. RedXDawn. A dose by any of these names is, well .... no one's quite sure, actually. This stuff isn't regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and there's no standards applied to its production. Anything could be in there.

Think before you use: On March 4, Newsweek ran an article called "Fake-Pot Panic" that mocked "breathless news reports" across the nation about a newish, little-understood, and mostly legal drug that's often known by the brand name K2.

"Maybe you even caught a Missouri detective's panicked prediction that K2 is 'going to end up killing somebody,'" the article chided. "As far as we know, though, it hasn't. Why is it suddenly getting all this attention?"

Three months later, David Rozga, an Iowa 18-year-old, smoked K2, became delusional and anxious, and shot himself to death. Colorado Springs Independent, Thu, 22 Jul 2010

Contact Colorado Drug Rehab, helps you make decisions on a drug rehab treatment center as well as helping your get the best alcohol and drug assessments and evaluations. We are Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselors that have reviewed over 150 rehab centers, on site, and performed more than 500 alcohol and drug assessments and evaluations, and can share our experiences and help you find the best program or get a fair and honest alcohol or drug assessment to help you with legal issues or help you find what level of treatment or rehab is most appropriate!

 

 

 

 


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